Posts Tagged tamagoyaki

Spicy tuna tamagoyaki (ツナ玉子焼き)

Experiment: Spicy tuna tamagoyaki ( ツナ玉子焼き)

 

Introduction:

The Clover Leaf spicy Thai Chili tuna was on sale for $0.99 per can.  I couldn’t resist buying a few cans.  While I was thinking how to eat it besides the usual “eat it with cracker” way, tamagoyaki came to my mind.  Yep!  It’s egg again! Hahaha!

 

Materials:

1 can spicy Thai Chili tuna (85 g)
4-5 eggs

 

Procedure:

1) Beat the eggs in a bowl.  Open the can of tuna and put it in the egg mixture.  Mix well.  (I took the red pepper in the can out.  I don’t wanna bite into the red pepper!)

2) Heat up a small pan.  Turn the heat to medium.

3) Brush oil onto the pan.  Pour a thin layer of the egg mixture onto the pan.  When it’s half cooked, roll one side of the egg to the other side.

4) Brush oil onto the pan again.  Lift the tamagoyaki and brush oil under the tamagoyaki as well.

5) Pour a thin layer of the egg mixture onto the pan.  Lift the tamagoyaki and let the egg mixture go under the tamagoyaki as well.

6) When the new egg layer is half cooked, you can roll the tamagoyaki to the other end of the pan.

7) Repeat the process of brushing oil, pour in egg mixture, roll the tamagoyaki from one side to the other side until the egg mixture is finished.

8 ) Prepare a piece of saran wrap and place it on top of a sushi mat.  Put the tamagoyaki onto the saran wrap while it’s still hot.  Wrap it.

9) Roll the sushi mat and shape the tamagoyaki into the shape you want.

10) Let it sit and cool.  Cut and serve.

(You can click here for pictures on how to make tamagoyaki!)

 

Results:

 

Discussions:

1) You can add some spice into the eggs if you want it spicier.  I find that one can of the tuna is pretty good already for 4-5 eggs.

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Tamago-yaki (玉子焼き)

Experiment: Tamagoyaki (玉子焼き)

Introduction:
I have loooooved eggs since I was young.  When I saw tamagoyaki the very first time in a restaurant, I wanted to order it.  Then my mom said, “It’s only egg!  I’ll make it at home for you.  It’s expensive to eat here (in a restaurant).” It’s true… it’s not cheap to eat tamagoyaki when you think of the main ingredient being only eggs.  OH well…my mom never made it for me.  So when I grew up, I learned to make it… so that I can eat it whenever I want… and it’s cheap!  Coz you only need eggs, sugar and sake.

I always thought that you need a rectanglular pan to make tamagoyaki.  No.  Acutally, you don’t need one.  You can use a round pan to make it.  I think it doesn’t matter if your pan is rectangular, round or square; the key is that the pan needs to be small.  Otherwise, you’ll need LOOOOTS of eggs to make the tamagoyaki thick. 

Materials:
6 eggs
2 tbs sugar
1 tbs Sake
Oil

Procedure:
1) Beat the eggs.  Add the sugar and sake into the egg mixture and mix well.

2) Heat up a small pan.  Turn the heat to medium.

3) Brush oil onto the pan.  Pour a thin layer of the egg mixture onto the pan.  When it’s half cooked, roll one side of the egg to the other side.  (Let’s say, this time is from left to right)

4) Brush oil onto the pan again.  Lift the tamagoyaki and brush oil under the tamagoyaki as well!

5) Pour a thin layer of the egg mixture onto the pan.  Lift the tamagoyaki and let the egg mixture go under the tamagoyaki as well!  So that when you roll the tamagoyaki, it’ll be attached to the new egg layer.

6) When the new egg layer is half cooked, you can roll the tamagoyaki to the other end of the pan.  (This time would be right to left)

7) Repeat the process of brushing oil, pour in egg mixture, roll the tamagoyaki from one side to the other side.  The tamagoyaki will “grow” in thickness… hehe!

  

8 ) Prepare a piece of saran wrap and place it on top of a sushi mat.  When your egg mixture is finished and you have finished rolling the tamagoyaki, put the tamagoyaki onto the saran wrap while it’s still hot.  Wrap it.

9) Roll the sushi mat and shape the tamagoyaki into the shape you want.

10) Let it sit and cool. 

11) Cut the tamagoyaki into small pieces and eat! 🙂

Results:

Discussions:
1) I have tried skipping the brushing oil part.  It didn’t work that well.  You may not be able to roll the egg.  So rememeber to brush oil in between! Oh and I think usuing a non-stick pan helps!

 2) I actually don’t like my tamagoyaki that sweet, so I may actually use less sugar and add more sake than the recipe suggested. 

 

Reference:

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Picnic Bento

 

My blogger friend from Hong Kong came over to Vancouver a while ago.  She said she has seen pictures of my bento boxes, and she wanted to try it.  Well… she also said that it wouldn’t be fun if we eat it at home.  She suggested to go to a park to have a picnic.  We then decided to go to Central Park in Burnaby.

 

 

I pretty much just prepared the bento, and she took care of everything else.  She’s really into beautiful stuff… so when I arrived and started to set up the table with her… Wow!  Everything was so pretty!  She even brought stuff just for the LOOK! hehe!

 

 

I really enjoyed the picnic! 🙂 Everything was so pretty!  I think next time I go picnic, I know what to bring to give that “picnic” look. 🙂

Anyways… let’s talk about the bento box.  I had a hard time deciding what to make and how to arrange the food nicely.  I just bought a lot of food for the bento, and then made it and arrange to see what fits in the box and what doesn’t.  I find that “making” the food didn’t take long, deciding on what to put in and arrange the food nicely actually took me longer.  I think with practice, it’d take me less time to “design” a bento box.  Oh in case you’re wondering how long it took me to finish these 3 tiers… Hmm I think I started at 7:30 and everything was ready by 11:10.

 

First tier – Inari suhi and Onigiri:

 

Second tier – Heart shaped tamago yaki, blueberry jam ham pinwheels, quail eggs, strawberry tomatoes and bear/star shaped fishcakes.

 

Their tier – Straberries, Strawberry tomatoes, mandarin oranges and edamame

 

 

 

 

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